The Best Places to Visit in Iowa State, USA

The Best Places to Visit in Iowa State, USA
16 Comments



Views:12453|Rating:4.11|View Time:8:55Minutes|Likes:74|Dislikes:16
The Best Places to Visit in Iowa State, USA

Iowa, a Midwestern U.S. state, sits between the Missouri and Mississippi rivers.  It is the 26th most extensive in land area and the 30th most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital and largest city by population is Des Moines. Iowa has been listed as one of the safest states to live. Pastures and fields of corn cover much of the heart of the Heartland, but there’s much more to Iowa than its famously green fields: dramatic bluffs along the Mississippi River, quintessential small towns, and vibrant midsize cities like Des Moines. Explore the capital city of Des Moines and discover other reasons to explore the Hawkeye State!

1.Iowa City
2.Des Moines
3.Iowa Great Lakes
4.Field of Dreams
5.Grotto of the Redemption
6.Effigy Mounds National Monument
7.Great River Road National Scenic Byway
8.Pikes Peak State Park
9.Maquoketa Caves State Park
10.Amana Colonies

The Best Places to Visit in Iowa,USA Iowa, a Midwestern U.S. state, sits between
the Missouri and Mississippi rivers.  It is the 26th most extensive in land area
and the 30th most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital and largest city by
population is Des Moines. Iowa has been listed as one of the safest states to live.
Pastures and fields of corn cover much of the heart of the Heartland, but there's much
more to Iowa than its famously green fields: dramatic bluffs along the Mississippi River,
quintessential small towns, and vibrant midsize cities like Des Moines. Explore the capital
city of Des Moines and discover other reasons to explore the Hawkeye State! Iowa City was the second capital of the Iowa
Territory and the first capital city of the State of Iowa. The Old Capitol building is
a National Historic Landmark in the center of the University of Iowa campus. The University
of Iowa Art Museum and Plum Grove, the home of the first Governor of Iowa, are also tourist
attractions. In 2008, Forbes magazine named Iowa City the second-best small metropolitan
area for doing business in the United States. Iowa's capital is known for being home to
the State Fair, but Des Moines also gives artists, foodies and explorers plenty to love.
A visit to Iowa's capital city means a chance to try new restaurants, visit local boutiques,
take in tons of free art and browse an epic Saturday-morning farmers market. Visiting
the state capitol, the Iowa State Fair, Adventureland Park and a world-class sculpture park are
just a few of the things to do in Des Moines. Des Moines is a major center of the U.S. insurance
industry and has a sizable financial services and publishing business base. The city was
credited as the "number one spot for U.S. insurance companies" in a Business Wire article
and named the third-largest "insurance capital" of the world. Iowa Great Lakes
Some people might be surprised by this classic vacation spot 210 miles northwest of Des Moines.
A string of glacial lakes covers about 15,000 acres, forming the "Iowa Great Lakes." Families
return to places such as Big Spirit Lake (population 4,700) and Okoboji (population 850) year
after year, fishing off docks and hopping on carnival rides at Arnolds Park, a turn-of-the-last-century
theme park that's as retro as they come.  The Field of Dreams is a baseball field and pop-culture
tourist attraction built originally for the movie of the same name. It is in Dubuque
County, Iowa, near Dyersville. The studio built the baseball diamond on two
farms, a few miles outside Dyersville. When production completed, the baseball diamond
created for the movie was left behind. Most of the baseball field, including the diamond
and the adjacent house, was on one farm owned by the Lansing family, but the left and center
field were on an adjacent property owned by the Ameskamp family. The field was built on
the two properties because the producers wanted the field in a location where sunset shots
would be uninhibited. The Shrine of the Grotto of the Redemption is
a religious shrine located in West Bend, Iowa. The Grotto is frequently considered
the “Eighth Wonder of the World” and  contains a large collection of minerals and petrifications and
is believed to be the largest grotto in the world. It is also "considered to be the world's
most complete man-made collection of minerals, fossils, shells, and petrifications in one place. A conglomeration
of nine grottos depicting scenes in the life of Jesus.Over 100,000 people visit the
Grotto each year. Grotto is frequently considered the “Eighth Wonder of the World” a collection
of precious stones and gems. Effigy Mounds National Monument preserves
more than 200 prehistoric mounds built by Native Americans. Numerous effigy mounds are shaped
like animals, including bears and birds. These were built mostly in the first millennium,
by peoples of the Woodland Culture. As of 2017, they have been featured on the US quarter.The
park's visitor center is located in Harpers Ferry, Iowa, just north of Marquette.Prehistoric
earthworks by mound builder cultures are common in the Midwest. However, mounds in
the shape of mammals, birds, or reptiles, known as effigies, apparently were constructed
primarily by peoples in what is now known as southern Wisconsin, northeast Iowa. A journey along Iowa's 325 miles of the Great
River Road National Scenic Byway blasts away stereotypical images of a flat Hawkeye State.
The massive river eases around a parade of communities–from tiny towns to busy midsize
cities–and spectacular vistas fill the spaces in between.
In southern Iowa, eagles soar above the lock at Keokuk (population 10,400), where wealth
made from the river created fine homes and public buildings. Heading north, the river
weaves through communities such as Bellevue (population 2,300), where watercraft negotiate the lock
near galleries and antiques shops; the river port of Dubuque (population 57,200), with
its thriving waterfront activities; and Guttenberg (population 1,900), where street names such as Goethe
and Schiller reflect the German roots. Pikes Peak State Park is a state park of Iowa,
US, featuring a 500-foot (150 m) bluff overlooking the Upper Mississippi River opposite the
confluence of the Wisconsin River. The park is operated by the Iowa Department of Natural
Resources. It is nearly a thousand acres (4 km²) in extent. Pikes Peak State Park offers
excellent picnicking opportunities and it is one of the most photographed places in
Iowa. Pikes Peak is rich in natural, cultural and historical resources, and famed for its
majestic views of the Mississippi River. The park is named after Lieutenant Zebulon
Pike, sent by the government in 1805 to select a site for a military fort. Pike chose this
site but the government built the fort across the river. Pikes Peak officially became a
state park in 1936. Maquoketa Caves State Park
Cornfields and combines feel eons away from the lush and strangely exotic landscape at
Maquoketa Caves State Park (30 miles south of Dubuque), where a long wood staircase descends
from a concrete picnic area into an almost prehistoric world. Towering stone walls, moss-covered
rocks and an emerald canopy unfold around the Maquoketa Caves' 16 caves and crawl spaces.
Ducking under low-hanging rocks and clambering along a roller coaster of steps, visitors
feel like real explorers. In the green east-central Iowa River Valley
along Interstate-80 (100 miles east of Des Moines), the seven Amana Colonies have clung
to their roots with German steadfastness since 1855. Almost half the residents are descendants
of the original German colonists; inns, restaurants and shops draw heavily on traditional foods
and handicrafts. At the Amana Heritage Society, ask about custom tours in addition to the
five museum sites,shop for beautiful, classic quilts at Heritage Designs or find local
ham, bacon, sausage and cheese at Amana Meat Shop and Smokehouse.