COLUMBIA SOUTH CAROLINA HOODS

COLUMBIA SOUTH CAROLINA HOODS
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SoHo and Greenwich Village, New York

SoHo and Greenwich Village, New York
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Two of New York's best neighborhoods for walking
are Soho and Greenwich Village, and in this segment we're going to take you on a stroll
through the area, starting out with several minutes wandering through Soho, which is the
neighborhood south of Houston Street, and it had been a rundown industrial neighborhood
with factories, warehouses and truck-loading ramps, but in the last 40 years, it became
New York's supreme cutting-edge, artistic neighborhood. Soho got more and more popular as lots of
artist moved in, attracted originally by cheap rents in illegal lofts. Some excellent streets to meander include
Spring, Prince, Broome, West Broadway and Mercer. The map gives you a rough idea of where we're
going. Walk a couple blocks along Green Street to
find the thickest concentration of galleries, cafés and hip shops, and the largest collection
of cast-iron façades. Designer shops, pricey art galleries, fancy
fashion emporiums have definitely moved in and taken over, and yet there are still many
clever small shops here that appeal to the discriminating tastes of hip clientele. Or for cheaper bargains, sidewalk stands and
sometimes parking lot flea markets sell all kinds of useful junk. Here and there streets are still paved in
the original Belgian cobblestones, imparting a strong European feeling to the neighborhood. Soho is very distinct with these cast-iron
façades. It has the largest collection of cast-iron
buildings in America, constructed mostly in the last half of the 19th century. From the late 1960s, art galleries came in,
and then restaurants and trendy shops followed. Prices skyrocketed to a point where only the
wealthiest dot-comers can live there now. The artists have been squeezed out and relocated
to Brooklyn, Jersey, the East Village and Lower East Side, but with a similar sequence
of changes now happening there too in that never-ending process of gentrification. Big money has taken over most parts of the
city. If only you had the foresight and the money
to purchase some property here, back 40 years ago, you would be a zillionaire today. The most famous Soho food shop is the original
Dean and DeLuca, on Broadway at Prince Street, which is gourmet heaven. They started out as a small sandwich bar and
grew into the city's trendiest food market, but you can still get sandwiches, coffee and
snacks to nibble on. It's busy all day and lively right into the
evening. They have expanded now with some branches
outside of New York, but this is the original location. From Dean and DeLuca we walk north to the
Village along Broadway, cross Houston Street. It just takes a few minutes passing more interesting
blocks of the city with coffee shops and little markets, which soon brings us to the NYU student
section. Since the 1830s, New York University has had
a campus here which grew much larger in 1973 when their Bronx campus was relocated and
now NYU owns large sections of the area and most of the buildings around Washington Square
Park. NYU is the largest private college in the
country and one of the best. We'll go through Washington Square Park, down
McDougall, over to Bleecker Street and into the West Village where we will spend most
of our program, especially walking along Bleecker Street. You can walk almost anywhere, any which way
you want in the Village and have a great time, but we're going to show you a suggested route
that hits a lot of the highlights. Relatively quiet neighborhood, but in Manhattan
the possibility of action is always waiting right around the corner with that blend of
exciting, high-energy and peaceful, little shops, cafés and streets. The central gathering place of the Village
is Washington Square Park, a leafy green space with benches, fountains, many people going
by, and sometimes some wonderful musical entertainment. (Music plays)
The village has always been a hotbed of jazz, and that tradition continues with musicians
in the streets and in the parks. And watch this passerby turn his coffee cup
into a bongo drum and play along. Notable performers in the jazz clubs here
included Pearl Bailey Count Basie, Nat King Cole, John Coletrain Miles Davis, Ella Fitzgerald,
Coleman Hawkins, Billie Holiday, Leadbelly, Charlie Parker, Dinah Washington and the folk
scene with The Weavers and especially Bob Dylan. The white marble Washington Arch dominates
the park, 86 feet high with a span 30 feet wide, designed by Stanford White. It was completed in 1895 and commemorates
the first inauguration of George Washington, namesake of the park. Photographed in early June, you can see how
pleasant the weather can be great, and great to see sitting outdoors on the benches, but
here's how it can look in the winter on a snowy day in February. In the 18th century this was a cemetery for
poor people, 20,000 of them are still underground here. There are lots of squirrels in the park, and
typical of city squirrels, they’re used to people. These guys are pretty friendly. Maybe they were extra hungry because the snow
was covering their usual feasting grounds. So, these young gals were feeding them, three
at a time. Looking towards Washington Square North just
beyond the arch. You'll see a stately row of brick townhomes. These been here since the 1830s. Like most of the buildings around Washington
Square Park, they’re now owned and occupied by NYU. On the map you can see how many buildings
NYU has all around Washington Square Park, enough space to take care of its 26,000 undergraduates. We are going to walk out the southwest corner
of the park onto McDougall Street, one of the great spots in the village. It was the epicenter of bohemian life throughout
most of the 20th century with jazz singers and poets and writers such as Bob Dylan, James
Baldwin, Jackson Pollock, Ernest Hemingway, Eugene O'Neill, a host of famous writers,
painters and beatniks. It’s still considered a colorful and magnetic
venue, a great place to stroll and maybe get an exotic bite to eat. In spite of the gentrification of most of
the village, McDougall Street still seems like a working-class neighborhood. The cuisines of the world are on display here,
ranging from Ethiopian, Egyptian, Italian, falafels, French crepes, and of course there's
always pizza. This one block between West 3rd and Bleecker
is among the best that New York has to offer. And then it gets even better as you take a
turn on Bleecker Street, which is the longest interesting street in the village. It even has a couple of tiny parks with fountains. As you stroll along Bleecker you'll be tempted
by the side streets as well. It's a terrific place to meander. The streets here are well adapted to the mood
of the random rambler for they lead everywhere and nowhere, and just wind about in the most
irregular ways. The route does get pretty twisted, which is
a big part of the charm of this area, so you could just play it by ear, and improvise to
pick your walking route. However, the streets can be confusing to navigate. You don't have to have a plan, but it can
help to use a map to ensure you don't get too lost and miss out on some worthwhile streets. Our route so far to Bleecker, and then we
will continue on down to Hudson Street, kind of the western limits of the Village. Hudson is a broad commercial street with a
nice neighborhood feeling of shops and restaurants and apartments. From there we swing back into the main part
of the Village along a street named Grove, and along Grove we see a place called Grove
Court, with attractive old houses built around a courtyard. Grove is another one of those fascinating
streets with a mix of commercial and residential. It would be a great place to live if you could
afford it. Crossing Bleecker Street and continuing along
into a very intricate part of the street network of Greenwich Village. It has to be the most complicated intersection
in Manhattan. We take a look at 8th Street. You might try 10th Street, and then double
back all along Christopher Street, which is another one of those don't-miss-it places
worth your time for a walk along. It's a place that became an international
symbol of gay liberation – returning to Bleecker. The Village is one of America's most expensive
neighborhoods, costing over two million for the average thousand square-foot apartment. Residents of the Village still possess a strong
community identity and are proud of their neighborhood’s unique history and fame,
and its well-known liberal live and let live attitudes. The village is a world unto itself. It's a little escape from the action in midtown
Manhattan that shouldn't be missed. Residents and preservation groups have been
concerned about developments in the Village and have fought to preserve its architectural
and historic integrity. More than 50 blocks of the Village are part
of a historic district. Redevelopment in that area is severely restricted
and developers must preserve the main façade and aesthetics of the building during renovation. When done with the Village, if you're heading
back to Midtown, the easiest way to get there is take the subway, and you'll find a convenient
stop at Washington Square with several lines running through it. You'll need a Metro Card to get into the station
and you can buy those from vending machines. If you're in town for five or six days, buy
the one-week pass. It's really a good value for unlimited travel
on subway and city bus. With that one pass, you don't have to bother
purchasing a ticket every time you enter the subway. It's a lot more convenient, and cheaper in
the long run for the normal traveler. Especially if you're seeing as much of the
city as we are presenting to you in our series on New York, that you can find in our collection.



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Two of New York’s best neighborhoods for walking are Soho and Greenwich Village, and in this segment we’re going to take you on a stroll through the area, starting out with several minutes wandering through Soho, which is the neighborhood south of Houston Street. It had been a rundown industrial neighborhood with factories, warehouses and truck-loading ramps, but in the last 40 years, it became New York’s supreme cutting-edge, artistic neighborhood. Soho got more and more popular as lots of artist moved in, attracted originally by cheap rents in illegal lofts.
From the late 1960s, art galleries came in, and then restaurants and trendy shops followed.
Prices skyrocketed to a point where only the wealthiest dot-comers can live there now.
The artists have been squeezed out and relocated to Brooklyn, Jersey, the East Village and Lower East Side, but with a similar sequence of changes now happening there too in that never-ending process of gentrification.
Big money has taken over most parts of the city.
We walk north to the Village along Broadway, cross Houston Street. It just takes a few minutes passing more interesting blocks of the city with coffee shops and little markets, which soon brings us to the NYU student section.
We’ll go through Washington Square Park, down McDougall, over to Bleecker Street and into the West Village where we will spend most of our program, especially walking along Bleecker Street.
You can walk almost anywhere, any which way you want in the Village and have a great time, but we’re going to show you a suggested route that hits a lot of the highlights.

KANSAS CITY MISSOURI HOODS

KANSAS CITY MISSOURI HOODS
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