SoHo and Greenwich Village, New York

SoHo and Greenwich Village, New York
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Two of New York's best neighborhoods for walking
are Soho and Greenwich Village, and in this segment we're going to take you on a stroll
through the area, starting out with several minutes wandering through Soho, which is the
neighborhood south of Houston Street, and it had been a rundown industrial neighborhood
with factories, warehouses and truck-loading ramps, but in the last 40 years, it became
New York's supreme cutting-edge, artistic neighborhood. Soho got more and more popular as lots of
artist moved in, attracted originally by cheap rents in illegal lofts. Some excellent streets to meander include
Spring, Prince, Broome, West Broadway and Mercer. The map gives you a rough idea of where we're
going. Walk a couple blocks along Green Street to
find the thickest concentration of galleries, cafés and hip shops, and the largest collection
of cast-iron façades. Designer shops, pricey art galleries, fancy
fashion emporiums have definitely moved in and taken over, and yet there are still many
clever small shops here that appeal to the discriminating tastes of hip clientele. Or for cheaper bargains, sidewalk stands and
sometimes parking lot flea markets sell all kinds of useful junk. Here and there streets are still paved in
the original Belgian cobblestones, imparting a strong European feeling to the neighborhood. Soho is very distinct with these cast-iron
façades. It has the largest collection of cast-iron
buildings in America, constructed mostly in the last half of the 19th century. From the late 1960s, art galleries came in,
and then restaurants and trendy shops followed. Prices skyrocketed to a point where only the
wealthiest dot-comers can live there now. The artists have been squeezed out and relocated
to Brooklyn, Jersey, the East Village and Lower East Side, but with a similar sequence
of changes now happening there too in that never-ending process of gentrification. Big money has taken over most parts of the
city. If only you had the foresight and the money
to purchase some property here, back 40 years ago, you would be a zillionaire today. The most famous Soho food shop is the original
Dean and DeLuca, on Broadway at Prince Street, which is gourmet heaven. They started out as a small sandwich bar and
grew into the city's trendiest food market, but you can still get sandwiches, coffee and
snacks to nibble on. It's busy all day and lively right into the
evening. They have expanded now with some branches
outside of New York, but this is the original location. From Dean and DeLuca we walk north to the
Village along Broadway, cross Houston Street. It just takes a few minutes passing more interesting
blocks of the city with coffee shops and little markets, which soon brings us to the NYU student
section. Since the 1830s, New York University has had
a campus here which grew much larger in 1973 when their Bronx campus was relocated and
now NYU owns large sections of the area and most of the buildings around Washington Square
Park. NYU is the largest private college in the
country and one of the best. We'll go through Washington Square Park, down
McDougall, over to Bleecker Street and into the West Village where we will spend most
of our program, especially walking along Bleecker Street. You can walk almost anywhere, any which way
you want in the Village and have a great time, but we're going to show you a suggested route
that hits a lot of the highlights. Relatively quiet neighborhood, but in Manhattan
the possibility of action is always waiting right around the corner with that blend of
exciting, high-energy and peaceful, little shops, cafés and streets. The central gathering place of the Village
is Washington Square Park, a leafy green space with benches, fountains, many people going
by, and sometimes some wonderful musical entertainment. (Music plays)
The village has always been a hotbed of jazz, and that tradition continues with musicians
in the streets and in the parks. And watch this passerby turn his coffee cup
into a bongo drum and play along. Notable performers in the jazz clubs here
included Pearl Bailey Count Basie, Nat King Cole, John Coletrain Miles Davis, Ella Fitzgerald,
Coleman Hawkins, Billie Holiday, Leadbelly, Charlie Parker, Dinah Washington and the folk
scene with The Weavers and especially Bob Dylan. The white marble Washington Arch dominates
the park, 86 feet high with a span 30 feet wide, designed by Stanford White. It was completed in 1895 and commemorates
the first inauguration of George Washington, namesake of the park. Photographed in early June, you can see how
pleasant the weather can be great, and great to see sitting outdoors on the benches, but
here's how it can look in the winter on a snowy day in February. In the 18th century this was a cemetery for
poor people, 20,000 of them are still underground here. There are lots of squirrels in the park, and
typical of city squirrels, they’re used to people. These guys are pretty friendly. Maybe they were extra hungry because the snow
was covering their usual feasting grounds. So, these young gals were feeding them, three
at a time. Looking towards Washington Square North just
beyond the arch. You'll see a stately row of brick townhomes. These been here since the 1830s. Like most of the buildings around Washington
Square Park, they’re now owned and occupied by NYU. On the map you can see how many buildings
NYU has all around Washington Square Park, enough space to take care of its 26,000 undergraduates. We are going to walk out the southwest corner
of the park onto McDougall Street, one of the great spots in the village. It was the epicenter of bohemian life throughout
most of the 20th century with jazz singers and poets and writers such as Bob Dylan, James
Baldwin, Jackson Pollock, Ernest Hemingway, Eugene O'Neill, a host of famous writers,
painters and beatniks. It’s still considered a colorful and magnetic
venue, a great place to stroll and maybe get an exotic bite to eat. In spite of the gentrification of most of
the village, McDougall Street still seems like a working-class neighborhood. The cuisines of the world are on display here,
ranging from Ethiopian, Egyptian, Italian, falafels, French crepes, and of course there's
always pizza. This one block between West 3rd and Bleecker
is among the best that New York has to offer. And then it gets even better as you take a
turn on Bleecker Street, which is the longest interesting street in the village. It even has a couple of tiny parks with fountains. As you stroll along Bleecker you'll be tempted
by the side streets as well. It's a terrific place to meander. The streets here are well adapted to the mood
of the random rambler for they lead everywhere and nowhere, and just wind about in the most
irregular ways. The route does get pretty twisted, which is
a big part of the charm of this area, so you could just play it by ear, and improvise to
pick your walking route. However, the streets can be confusing to navigate. You don't have to have a plan, but it can
help to use a map to ensure you don't get too lost and miss out on some worthwhile streets. Our route so far to Bleecker, and then we
will continue on down to Hudson Street, kind of the western limits of the Village. Hudson is a broad commercial street with a
nice neighborhood feeling of shops and restaurants and apartments. From there we swing back into the main part
of the Village along a street named Grove, and along Grove we see a place called Grove
Court, with attractive old houses built around a courtyard. Grove is another one of those fascinating
streets with a mix of commercial and residential. It would be a great place to live if you could
afford it. Crossing Bleecker Street and continuing along
into a very intricate part of the street network of Greenwich Village. It has to be the most complicated intersection
in Manhattan. We take a look at 8th Street. You might try 10th Street, and then double
back all along Christopher Street, which is another one of those don't-miss-it places
worth your time for a walk along. It's a place that became an international
symbol of gay liberation – returning to Bleecker. The Village is one of America's most expensive
neighborhoods, costing over two million for the average thousand square-foot apartment. Residents of the Village still possess a strong
community identity and are proud of their neighborhood’s unique history and fame,
and its well-known liberal live and let live attitudes. The village is a world unto itself. It's a little escape from the action in midtown
Manhattan that shouldn't be missed. Residents and preservation groups have been
concerned about developments in the Village and have fought to preserve its architectural
and historic integrity. More than 50 blocks of the Village are part
of a historic district. Redevelopment in that area is severely restricted
and developers must preserve the main façade and aesthetics of the building during renovation. When done with the Village, if you're heading
back to Midtown, the easiest way to get there is take the subway, and you'll find a convenient
stop at Washington Square with several lines running through it. You'll need a Metro Card to get into the station
and you can buy those from vending machines. If you're in town for five or six days, buy
the one-week pass. It's really a good value for unlimited travel
on subway and city bus. With that one pass, you don't have to bother
purchasing a ticket every time you enter the subway. It's a lot more convenient, and cheaper in
the long run for the normal traveler. Especially if you're seeing as much of the
city as we are presenting to you in our series on New York, that you can find in our collection.



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Two of New York’s best neighborhoods for walking are Soho and Greenwich Village, and in this segment we’re going to take you on a stroll through the area, starting out with several minutes wandering through Soho, which is the neighborhood south of Houston Street. It had been a rundown industrial neighborhood with factories, warehouses and truck-loading ramps, but in the last 40 years, it became New York’s supreme cutting-edge, artistic neighborhood. Soho got more and more popular as lots of artist moved in, attracted originally by cheap rents in illegal lofts.
From the late 1960s, art galleries came in, and then restaurants and trendy shops followed.
Prices skyrocketed to a point where only the wealthiest dot-comers can live there now.
The artists have been squeezed out and relocated to Brooklyn, Jersey, the East Village and Lower East Side, but with a similar sequence of changes now happening there too in that never-ending process of gentrification.
Big money has taken over most parts of the city.
We walk north to the Village along Broadway, cross Houston Street. It just takes a few minutes passing more interesting blocks of the city with coffee shops and little markets, which soon brings us to the NYU student section.
We’ll go through Washington Square Park, down McDougall, over to Bleecker Street and into the West Village where we will spend most of our program, especially walking along Bleecker Street.
You can walk almost anywhere, any which way you want in the Village and have a great time, but we’re going to show you a suggested route that hits a lot of the highlights.

Zermatt town, Switzerland

Zermatt town, Switzerland
26 Comments

And now we’re heading for Zermatt, Switzerland
– one of the most beautiful towns in the Alps, surrounded by 15,000-foot-high mountain
peaks. For a very long time Switzerland and the Alps
have been among the most beautiful regions, sought by millions of tourists from all parts
of the world. They display the greatest mountains and valleys
in their grandest form and have a special charm that is most seductive. The village has a relaxed atmosphere due to
its small size and perhaps its southern location. Zermatt is quite close to Italy. You can see in this Google Earth image how
Zermatt is in a valley surrounded by huge mountains, the biggest collection of the tall
mountains in all of Europe. It is a spectacular setting. You know, the famous mountain, the Matterhorn. But there are 29 other gigantic peaks all
around the city. We will take you up several by cable car and
rack railway, and we will take you hiking, plus of course we will show you the charming
town of Zermatt. It's a village with no cars set in the midst
of all these wonderful mountains. We'll take you up several of those big mountains
in our other movies about Zermatt. In this show we’re going to focus on Zermatt
town itself. The best way to reach Zermatt is by train,
because cars are not allowed in the village anyway. There's nice scenery out of both sides of
the train, as the train snakes its way up this long valley to Zermatt. It's a wonderful train journey to Zermatt
located in the heart of the Alps in the southern part of Switzerland. The train trip brings you up through a spectacular
series of mountains along the river valley. If you are driving a car, you can park it
a few miles away and take the train in for the last leg to get into the village. And then the train station is right in the
middle of town. So it's easy access. In fact, you can walk to most hotels in the
village within 10 to 15 minutes. It's quite easy. You see the road is well-paved so you can
walk it, no problem. You'll find during your visit that everything
in Zermatt is easy walking distance. If you have luggage that you don't want to
drag with you, you can arrange baggage delivery by then station porters and many hotels have
porter service that will meet you at the station with their small electric truck and will take
your baggage and perhaps yourself directly to the hotel, and bring the luggage right
to your room. Just be sure to let your hotel know ahead
of time what train you're arriving on. Those little electric buggies are about the
only wheeled vehicles in town along with some horse carriages. We’re staying at the delightful Hotel Butterfly,
just a couple of blocks from the train station, so it's easy for us to walk on over while
our baggage is hauled for us – nice comfortable rooms, beautiful hotel. Three hotels stand at the top rank in Zermatt. Five-star deluxe Hotel Zermatterhof, Mont
Cervin Palace and Monte Rosa. If you can afford to stay there, you can have
a meal or have a drink at the bar. Later in the program will show you a few of
the other 130 hotels in Zermatt. After the train journey we're a little hungry. We're ready for wurst, the national dish of
the country – and how convenient at this sidewalk stand. It's quick and inexpensive, and we’re on
our way to explore the village. Or you could sit at an outdoor table and watch
the town go by. The pedestrian streets are narrow and lined
with shops, restaurants, hotels and inns near the rail station. Homes and houses are scattered throughout,
some perched on the lower edge of the mountains. The main church in town is St. Mauritius,
built in the 1920s, but the first historical record of a church here goes back to the year
1285. Watch out for the horse carriages. You could take a ride in one, or if you're
staying in a fancy hotel you might be delivered from the rail station in a horse carriage. Some of the main stores that you'll see here
are the shops for Swiss watches, including many affordable models and some at the highest
end such as that the Patek Philippe branded store. You'll find the quality of display is really
eye-catching. After all they want to stop you in your tracks
as you're walking by the storefront, and while you can buy Swiss Army knives all over the
world it's very nice to purchase them here in the homeland, the authentic models from
it clothing boutiques and souvenir shops with everything from the Swiss brass bell to Lacey
hundred shifts porosity crystal figurines jewelry o'clock You’ll also find clothing
boutiques and souvenir shops with everything from the Swiss brass bell to lacey handkerchiefs,
Swarovski crystal figurines, jewelry, cuckoo clock, Goebel hummels. You can get music boxes and fine porcelain
dolls. Bakeries are everywhere, and you'll find gourmet
food stores. The best buys on chocolate bars are probably
in the grocery stores. 16a Some of the main stores you'll see here
are the shops first watches including many affordable models and some of the highest
in such as that the party Felipe rented store you'll find the quality of display is really
eye-catching after all they want to stop you in your tracks as you're walking by the storefront
and while you can buy Swiss Army knives all over the world it's very nice to purchase
them here in the homeland the authentic models from Victorinox. How many different models? Well in their catalog they'll offer you 1200
different kinds. You’ll also find clothing boutiques and
souvenir shops with everything from the Swiss brass bell to lacey handkerchiefs, Swarovski
crystal figurines, jewelry, cuckoo clocks. Don't worry about needing to pack things in
your suitcase because with typical Swiss efficiency they will ship it home for you, and that way
you can avoid the sales tax. Goebel Hummels, you can get music boxes and
fine porcelain dolls. Bakeries are everywhere and they usually sell
sandwiches for take-out so that can make an inexpensive picnic lunch, and you'll find
gourmet food stores. The best buys on chocolate bars are probably
in the grocery stores. Maybe consider fabrics for easy packable items
or tempted by Tissot, an excellent mid-priced watch. Of course, there are many shops that sell
clothing and accessories for hiking and skiing. And most of these stores also rent skiing
equipment, and the people who work in the stores can certainly help you choose the best
equipment for the day if you're heading for the slopes. If you're looking for backpacks or hiking
shoes, walking clothing, this little village is a great place to shop. While most of the merchandise is not made
in Switzerland, it is selected by the Swiss merchants to be the very best. A lot of it's made in Germany. The quality is superb and you can't go wrong
buying items in these shops, and the price is generally no higher than what you find
in a big city. You probably already have a backpack but you
could just admire the amazing variety and the modern technology of all these items on
display. You'll be tempted to upgrade your equipment. Being a small village in the south of the
country, many stores close for lunch, perhaps from noon till 2 PM. Then they reopen and close again about 6 PM. On Sunday it's better to shop in the morning
because a lot of the shops close Sunday afternoon. You might think up here in the mountains,
it's going to be cloudy a lot, but on the contrary, Zermatt is the sunniest part of
Switzerland. A study has shown there is an average duration
of 62% sunshine. It's number one in the country, compared to
number two, the Ticino in the south, with 55%. Turns out the surrounding mountains keep the
clouds away so Zermatt is blessed with a very special climate. Took a look into typical local restaurant,
the Haus Darioli. It's got that taverna style with the rustic
wooden benches, no tablecloth, simple menu, good prices, good food, and it's also a hotel. It gets 3 1/2 stars out of four rating on
Trip Advisor. So this is a pretty good place to consider. Another excellent restaurant is in the Walliserhof
Hotel. It's the Stubli Restaurant – quite rustic
and typical Swiss feeling – comfortable wooden furniture and a varied cuisine ranging
from steaks and salads to pastas Italian style. It's part of the Hotel Walliserhof, which
is one of the oldest in Zermatt. It's a family operated hotel. It first opened in 1898, located right on
the main street, but most of the rooms are set back. It's got thirty-four rooms, each one of them
different. There are just three main streets which run
along parallel to the River Matter Vispa, and numerous cross streets, little lanes,
especially around the station and behind the church, which forms the center of Zermatt
village. In general anything is at most a thirty-minute
walk away. And during the summer there are roads and
hiking trails leading up to a number of year-round restaurants. Warning: it seems peaceful in town, but they
do have some wild animals on the loose, sniffing their way around, trespassing, climbing through
fences. Beware the house cat. Well, it just shows how peaceful things can
get when you stroll a mere block away from the main street. Things calm down right away. In the old village, beside the Grand Hotel
Zermatterhof, about thirty ancient buildings show the traditional style of the original
Walser residents. There's barns and grain stores that are up
to 500 years old. That's a piece of living history that reveals
how the mountain farmers of Zermatt once lived. Notice the rocks that are placed at intervals
underneath the buildings, those flat round rocks. Those are guards to keep out the rodents and
the insects from the grain storage areas. The roofs of these typically valet style buildings
are covered with shingles made of flat stone slabs. Their sun-beaten wooden walls are made of
larch wood and stand up on stilts for storage space down below. Sometimes there's firewood stacked up down
there. Sometimes animals were kept in a barn underneath
the house to keep everybody warm, the animals and the people living upstairs. This section of town is called Hinterdorf
and it's the oldest surviving village center. There were barns where people would thresh
the grain and storehouses where they would dry their meat, slaughter their animals and
store their treasures from the land away in chests. The larch wood they are made of is a kind
of symbol of the Valais, as 29% of the trees in the area are larches. The larch is the heaviest and hardest of the
indigenous conifers. The wood is highly resinous which makes it
very durable and weather-resistant. And this, combined with the dark color of
the wood means that the house will heat up during the day when it's exposed to the sun,
producing energy. And the people who live in these houses don't
need much heating in the daytime in winter, at least in the rooms that face the sunny
side. The preservation of these buildings is of
growing importance to the local communities and the Swiss Heritage Society, and fortunately,
to the owners themselves. These buildings symbolize the customs, the
traditions, and farming culture at the highest altitudes in this Alpine region. Throughout the country, there are about 50,000
of these agricultural buildings still in existence. Outside the village throughout this Zermatt
region, there are an estimated 720 of these so-called Hofstetan-type buildings. The old town is just around the corner from
the main street – takes less than a minute to walk there, but it's easily overlooked
because it's not obvious. Bicycles are allowed in town, but on the main
street here you are only allowed to walk them, not to ride them. You could get a big ticket from the local
police for peddling your bicycle down the main lane. During the day the town is quite busy, year-round,
but something special happens in the early evening. It gets much quieter. The shops have closed down, the daytrippers
are gone, the bus tour groups are back on their trains and out of here, and it's just
left to the people who are spending the evening, and the locals. It's the perfect time to take a leisurely
stroll from one end of town to the other – it's only about a kilometer so it's a very easy
walk. They have a lovely public tennis court with
clay courts and lights in the evening. It is mostly for locals because tourists are
going to bring their tennis rackets. So it's a nice amenity for people live here. Switzerland has one of the world's highest
qualities of life and they really do take care of their people. They don't allow any cars here but they’ve
got horse and buggy. You can rent a bicycle, there's little electric
vehicles to take your baggage from the hotel to the train station and of course you can
walk, it's a great place for walking. That's right. It's an automobile free zone. And there is pedestrians. And even though it's busy with tourists they
have really managed to retain the charm and this Alpine character. There's wonderful nature hikes all around
the town, ranging from very easy half-hour strolls on a level gradient paved pathway
up to some serious mountain hiking and rock climbing. And there's skiing in the summertime all year
round you’ve got skiing here in Zermatt. It has the largest all year-round skiing terrain
in the entire Alpine area. So it makes for a fascinating place. There's tremendous mountains all around it
and of course the most famous mountain in all of Switzerland, the Matterhorn, one of
the most famous mountains in the entire world. The Matterhorn is the most vertical steep
mountains that you can find any place on the planet. The fun continues with further walking in
the village of Zermatt. Right down the main lane, you see it is lined
with all sorts of interesting shops, restaurants, buildings and fascinating people to watch
always. Got a love the variety of eateries here in
town from the simple sidewalk sausage stand to these nice outdoor restaurants. You can sit on the terrace and you are right
on the main lane here and watch the people go by. Of course Zermatt is a year-round holiday
resort town, great in the summer for hiking and walking and just being this beautiful
village, and the winter it's a tremendous ski resort. There are places where you can actually ski
all summer long at the top of the Klein Matterhorn – it's the largest summer ski slopes in
all of Europe, but mostly summer activities are relaxing in the town, and taking a walk
out in the countryside, and riding up to those beautiful mountain heights for the views. As you can see it's a lot of fun just to walk
along on the main lane of the village. You can go back and forth, it's just about
a mile or a kilometer and a half from one end to the other, and there's some little
side lanes you can explore as well. While this is pretty town can easily keep
you occupied for a couple of days with its attractions and shops and things, you certainly
want to get out of town up into the hills. That's the main reason for coming to Zermatt
and we will show you that in two other movies where we take you up various mountains all
around the town to the Klein Matterhorn, Gornergrat and Sunnegga. Look for that in our series. Unfortunately, there are visitors who only
stay in town and don't go up to the mountains but don't make that mistake. We happened to be in Zermatt during a very
special time of the year to see the goats parade. This happens during the summer time from late
June until the middle of August, and the goats come walking through the village two times:
at 9 o'clock in the morning they are walking out from the town to the pasture, and 5 PM
in the evening they return to the village every day, but only in the summer for about
six weeks. These are Valais black neck goats and they
are herd of about 50 animals who are the stars of Zermatt summertime. The goat herders are youngsters who live in
the area and each day three different children get the honor of walking the goats. Summer’s a fine time to be here – the
temperatures are pleasant. It does not usually get very hot in Zermatt. The town elevation is about 1600 m or about
5000 feet. So it's a pleasant summer environment, or
come in the spring and fall. It's a year-round destination. You might want to reserve your hotel well
ahead of time, though, because it is limited accommodations. There our 130 small hotels, but it is so popular
you better reserve in advance. You can also look at AirB&B and similar services. After all, Switzerland has been in the business
of guest houses for over a century. Notice the musicians at the top. At the end of the program will bring you a
little concert in the restaurant. We mentioned our hotel at the top of the program. It's the Hotel Butterfly and it's a lovely
spot. It's only a couple blocks from the train station,
no problem walking over here, and they have got balconies, they’ve terraces, rustic
wooden architecture. The hotel interior continues that Alpine motif
with a lot of wood counters and tables, the stone floor, carpeted lounge with comfortable
furnishings. Typical of most Swiss hotels, there is a very
nice breakfast that’s included with your room rate. You'll have the eggs and breads fruits and
cheeses and tomatoes and hams and cold cuts, a very satisfying breakfast. You could also take dinner here, if you like,
with an Italian accent to the cuisine. And it is set a couple blocks away from the
main street, really up on the hillside, and up on the hill you’ve got sheep grazing
– a very quiet spot. It's located 150 meters from the main train
station and even closer to the main street, so within a few minutes of stepping outside
the door you are right in the middle of things. We've also stayed at the Schloss Hotel, which
is perhaps the most conveniently located in the entire town. It's right across the street from the train
station. It's been owned and operated by the Perrin
family for the past 30 years. We enjoyed dinner and breakfast at the hotel. You'll have good value and quality in this
town when you include the hotel’s dinner offer in your room rate. The hotel underwent a huge transformation
in the year 2012 and really upgraded the luxury quality, including a spa and indoor swimming
pool. Right at the train station, there's a nice
Bahnhof buffet restaurant. They offer a typical Swiss cuisine with an
interior that looks like you're inside a train, and there's also a very inexpensive Bahnhof
Hotel, very basic almost a hostel – and they do not include breakfast but you save
a lot of money there. With 130 hotels to pick from, you'll find
a wide range of price and quality in Zermatt, but at the upper end there are several hotels
that really stand out above all the others. The Mont Cervin Palace is one of the top five-star
hotels in all Switzerland, founded originally by the Siller family over 150 years ago and
you can take a ride through town in their horse carriage. One of the great hotels of the world is located
here in Zermatt. It's the five-star super deluxe Zermatterhof
Hotel. They've got a garden restaurant. You can sit outdoors or sit indoors, and you
can have afternoon tea or a complete meal here. The Grand Hotel Zermatterhof is constantly
being upgraded and improved, and the guests are pampered. Zermatt is considered Switzerland's most popular
visitor destination getting about 2 million visitors a year. So depending on the time of day or the season,
this village could get pretty crowded. You might want to come in the shoulder season. Month of May is perfect, if it's late May,
especially. Early May you might run into snow on the trails
and that gets in the way of your hiking. Late May and early September are pretty much
the perfect times to be here. Zermatt is well-equipped to handle a large
number of visitors they get, with 130 hotels in the main village area, not to mention bed-and-breakfasts
and other hotels in nearby towns. Many people just come for the day, you can
arrive by train in the morning, walk around, although that's not recommended. There's so much to see and do in Zermatt you
really want to spend a couple of nights – at least two or even three nights would be very
nice. They have got 70 ski lifts if you're a skier,
especially in the wintertime they're all functioning. In the summer as we have seen up on the Klein
Matterhorn you can ski all year round. And naturally this is heaven for serious rock
climbers there. You'll see people with their ropes and spikes
in pickaxes walking down the main lane heading for the hills. We will be taking you outside the village
to surrounding mountains for some amazing views hiking and mountain railway experiences. In our other programs about Zermatt. Zermatt has Chinese restaurant, steakhouses,
sushi bars, noodle houses, hot dog stands, and one special restaurant that really stands
out above others. It's the Stübli at the Hotel Schweitzerhof
– very good traditional food and music, and the price is very reasonable. Salads, desserts, fish, chicken, meat, it's
a full-service menu including a rather unusual item – it some kind of a Swiss Army stew
and it's served in this canteen can – looks like it's right out of the Army rations, but
of course, it was quite delicious. The restaurant is located right on the main
street in the very heart of town, you can't miss it. It's part of the Hotel Schweitzerhof, but
it's got its own separate entrance, only a few blocks from the main train station. And it is about the only restaurant in town
where you can hear the traditional Swiss music performed by a live quartet. You can come in the early evening if you just
want a drink, say, 5 PM. The music is generally going at that hour. My friend Hans got so friendly with the waitress
that she came over and asked him to dance, and away they go. The restaurant is a showcase for many different
bands from throughout the region supporting the local traditional musicians. It really says a lot about how friendly this
small village of Zermatt is. The people who live and work here really have
a nice relaxed attitude. While this delightful music plays will share
with you a few more scenes of Zermatt. We have presented a whole series of movies
about this beautiful Swiss village. For now we're just kind of winding down our
visit with this stroll through town and show you some of the beautiful sights. [music plays]
We have a big series of movies about Switzerland taking you to most of the great places. We will bring you to Lucerne and up to Mount
Titlis, Mount Rigi, over to Interlaken, up to the Jungfrau. We will see the Shilthorn, Lauterbrunnen Valley,
Trummelbach Falls, Grindelwald, Bern, then on to Zermatt, the Matterhorn, yes we will
have a look at the Gornergrat, up the Sunnegga, do some hiking, show you the village then
on down to Lugano and Locarno in the southern part of Switzerland, the Ticino we also take
you to the great city of Zürich. Look for them in our Swiss collection.



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Zermatt, Switzerland – one of the most beautiful towns in the Alps, surrounded by 15,000-foot-high mountain peaks. In this show we’re going to focus on Zermatt town itself.
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The pedestrian streets are narrow and lined with shops, restaurants, hotels and inns near the rail station. Homes and houses are scattered throughout, some perched on the lower edge of the mountains.
For a very long time Switzerland and the Alps have been among the most beautiful regions, sought by millions of tourists from all parts of the world. They display the greatest mountains and valleys in their grandest form and have a special charm that is most seductive.
Zermatt is considered Switzerland’s most popular visitor destination getting about 2 million visitors a year. So depending on the time of day or the season, this village could get pretty crowded. You might want to come in the shoulder season. Month of May is perfect, if it’s late May, especially. Early May you might run into snow on the trails and that gets in the way of your hiking. Late May and early September are pretty much the perfect times to be here.
Zermatt is well-equipped to handle a large number of visitors they get, with 130 hotels in the main village area, not to mention bed-and-breakfasts and other hotels in nearby towns. Many people just come for the day, you can arrive by train in the morning, walk around, although that’s not recommended. There’s so much to see and do in Zermatt you really want to spend a couple of nights – at least two or even three nights would be very nice. They have got 70 ski lifts if you’re a skier, especially in the wintertime they’re all functioning. In the summer as we have seen up on the Klein Matterhorn you can ski all year round. And naturally this is heaven for serious rock climbers there. You’ll see people with their ropes and spikes in pickaxes walking down the main lane heading for the hills.

Dingle town & peninsula, Ireland

Dingle town & peninsula, Ireland
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We've been exploring the West Coast of Ireland
and now we’re heading for Dingle which some people would say is the finest destination
in the country. Dingle is a lush green peninsula extending
out into the Atlantic Ocean. Entering the Dingle Peninsula and passing
through villages of Blennerville, Camp and Annascaul. We stop by the roadside for a lovely view
looking down towards the coast and across the green fields. Next stop, Dingle, our home base for the next
couple days. The town is one of Ireland's best with excellent
hotels, of course many pubs, and in recent years, Dingle has become one of the gourmet
capitals of the country with many fine restaurants. We will be taking you inside a couple of them. The drive in gave us a nice overview and will
be taking you on several walks through town. Arriving at our Hotel Benners, it’s on the
main street of Dingle, a very convenient location. Most of the rooms are in the back away from
the street making very quiet relaxing spot to stay. We will show you a little more of the hotel
later in the program, but first we’re eager to get out and take a walk around. We just stepped right outside the front door
of the hotel and we are on Main Street, Dingle. It's got a lot of pubs, restaurants, a few
art galleries and shops, and yet it still retains a local feeling, because it's a couple
blocks away from the touristic center. Dingle is rather small, as we will show you
on the map. It's just got three principal streets, Main,
Green and Strand, with the center of action clustered in a few small blocks by the waterfront. You can see the town center is small enough
that you don't need to worry about looking at a map or reading a guidebook to find out
where to go. It's all right there in front of you, one
place after another, the shops, pubs and restaurants making it easy to see all of the center in
a couple of hours. Of course you’ll want to spend time eating
and drinking, and shopping. Because Dingle is out on this peninsula, a
little bit hard to get to, and yet it's one of the nicest places in Ireland. It's got the urban charm of a town. Most visitors find the real attraction is
the surrounding areas with the beautiful countryside and the historic sites. With a few minute’s drive, you are at the
edge of town and beyond that, you're in the countryside almost immediately. So we hop in our van and do a tour of the
peninsula. It's not unusual to run into some rain when
you're out here in the far tip of Europe, in the Atlantic Ocean. And we had some rain this morning, but it
cleared up a little bit during the day. Dingle is a peninsula sticking into the sea
at the western edge of Europe, set amid wild green scenery surrounded by the ocean. One of the main historic sites you'll see
is Dunbeg Fort. It's quite typical of the Celtic fortresses
of the Iron Age in Ireland. It's built right up against the edge of a
cliff, so it's easy to defend itself with the big walls on one side and the sea cliff
on the other. And what was a purpose, what was it for? Well, this was a nearly settlement. It is very early, 500 BC. This is what they built. They are under attack, they are defending
and attacking. Probably house up to maybe 20 people, you
know, 4 or 5 families with one head guy. Uh-huh. And when they come under attack, all in here,
they would bring animals in here, everything. And, there would have been timber structures
in here. And under attack that would bring animals
in here, keep everything safe because when they raid, they carry everything.. They are kept flat enough for walking. It’s called dry stonewalling. That’s what it is, and it’s still carried
out today. People can build walls that will last another
couple of hundred years. Curious stone structures, the beehive huts. These stone domes were first built about 3,000
years ago, it's believed, and they were probably the homes of ordinary people, of the farmers
who lived in the area, with several generations living together under one roof. Okay, we’ve got a series of, one, two, three
beehive huts, early settlements. The stone domes are built up and what's called
the corbel style in which each layer of stones as you go higher is grouped more towards the
center of the structure until finally meeting at the top, forming a very solid stone dome,
even without the use of mortar, all held together by gravity and friction. There called beehive huts because of the shape,
not because there were any bees inside. These were for people. It's believed this site was occupied until
about 1,200 A.D., by which time it had evolved into a farmstead for an extended family with
the habitation sites, and with the corrals and room for livestock, farm buildings and
storage places. The style of prehistoric stone-dome dwelling
is not unique to Ireland. It's found in the South of Italy and other
places throughout Europe dating back to the Iron Age, thousands of years ago. It's estimated there are the remains of about
400 beehive huts scattered throughout the Dingle Peninsula. This seems to be the most intact and accessible
combination of huts, right on the side of the road, so it's great place to stop and
learn about them. One of the legends says that they were the
huts of the monks. There were certainly a lot of monks and early
Irish Catholics living in the area, but there is no definite proof that these were occupied
by monks. They were built to about 1000 BC, well before
the Christian era, before the time of monks. We’re lucky today that some of Ireland's
prehistory is still quite visible, with stone structures that have survived for thousands
of years. It's believed that people have been living
on the Dingle Peninsula for at least 6,000 years, living a settled life as farmers and
fishermen in a Neolithic culture. Archaeologists have counted nearly 5000 stone
structures and ruins and remains on the Dingle Peninsula. It is the highest density of Irish prehistoric
structures in the entire country. The other most amazing of the ancient structures
on Dingle Peninsula is the Gallarus Oratory. It's an ancient stone church made with no
mortar at all. The stones are just piled one on top of the
other for a very snug fit. It's one of the oldest and most famous churches
in the whole of Ireland and yet mysterious. Nobody knows quite exactly how old it is. Estimates bring it back to the 9th-century,
10th-century, not quite sure. The church is in almost perfect condition
showing how incredibly-well it was constructed in the first place. The building technique again was the corbelling
system where one row of stones overlaps the row underneath, with the building getting
more narrow as it grows higher. The structure is waterproof and airtight,
forming a sheltered space for intimate religious activities. Presumably they came on Sundays and Holy days
to conduct mass. It was obviously for a small congregation. There wouldn't have been a very large population
back in those days because of famine and disease, plague, infant mortality, warfare, short lifespan. Living conditions were difficult, and yet
the masons were able to come together and build this structure of everlasting beauty. These people had a subsistence economy that
just provided the basic needs from what they could grow and catch and fish. A small amount of trading would've taken place,
but largely they were self-sufficient back in the Middle Ages when Gallarus was built,
fully utilizing all their resources. They used the mountains for gathering and
the more-rough patches for animal grazing and the arable land for farming, for their
main staples of oats, barley and wheat. If you drove from Dingle out around the peninsula
and back again, it's just about 25 miles so you can easily do it in half a day while stopping
to look at the sites, and then head back into town. Dingle is the westernmost point in Ireland,
and so the locals like to claim that it's the westernmost point in Europe, next stop
is New York. Dingle certainly is rather remote. One could say, unspoiled, a more natural setting
than in the hustle bustle of many European locations. It's not on the tourist route as much as more
famous places like Killarney and Galway and Dublin and Cork, and therefore it's a more
quiet place. It's a little bit more peaceful. And yet Main Street is lined with pubs as
you see, and there are lots of shops to keep you busy. Woolen garments are one of the favorite items
that people love to shop for here. Get that Irish fisherman sweater or a traditional
scarf. Along with tourism, fishing is another major
activity in Dingle and surrounding waters, which are very productive for large-scale
fishing. No surprise that restaurants here specialize
in fresh fish and one of the more popular places is Out Of the Blue, that is usually
packed with locals and tourists queue up to get in, so make your reservations ahead of
time. They are ranked number one on Trip Advisor,
but they don't serve any meat, only seafood and vegetables, of course. The menu changes every day depending on what's
available from the fishing boats that dock right across the street. If you're down at the harbor pier in the morning
you might see some of the big fishing boats come in. These are large-scale factory boats generally
from other European countries, and they use Dingle as a principal harbor. Fishing has always been a major economic activity
in Ireland. Maps from the early 14th century already shows
some important fishing grounds. Irish fisheries were famous and productive
for centuries, but by the middle of the 20th century it had begun to collapse. The recovery in recent decades has made the
waters off the Irish coast in the North Atlantic among the most productive in the world. The fish are brought ashore packed in ice
containers that are destined for the continent. They are heading for France and Spain, not
so much for consumption in Ireland, although some of the fish do find their way to the
local restaurants and fish markets. What is that? John Dory. John Dory? Yeah. Okay. And they’re all the same? It’s skate, haddock. It goes to France, other fish go to Spain. Spain? Yes, the skate, the haddock, the John Dory,
it goes to France. And the other fish, monkfish, goes to Spain,
yeah. Fish consumption in Spain is six times greater
than that of Ireland, per capita, a big demand. The local commercial Dingle fishing fleet
just consists of a handful of boats anymore. And recreational fishing is a popular item
with tourists, while the seagulls wait for their meal. We had a chance to eat in another one of the
better restaurants of Dingle, Global Village, owned by Nuala Cassidy and Martin Bealin,
right on the main street. They have been there for 16 years and developed
quite a reputation. Hello, Martin here, with Global Village restaurant. Well, we had a chance to talk with Martin,
the owner-chef, while he was hard at work in the kitchen preparing his foods. But he took some time to describe his dishes
and tell us about was happening in the Dingle restaurant scene. Dingle is the place to eat in Ireland, it’s
the one. The reason is, we’ve got the ocean right
beside us, got the hills all around us, organic farms, organic vegetables, great, chefs, and
a good tourist base to keep the whole thing ticking on. Not to mention the scenery, the culture, the
music, all of things that were here already in place, and tourism coming. Now we’ve just added food into the mix. Great quality craft beers and drinks happening
in the pubs. Dingle spend a tourist destination for thirty
years. It’s been a food destination, probably,
for only five or six now, since 2008. So as the tourism comes in, it starts to support
more restaurants, a snowball thing, you know, it starts a snowball, because chefs are attracted
to where they’re going to make a living. Nobody is setting up in a town in the middle
of nowhere where nobody’s going to buy your food. Ha. Right, right. And it’s good to have competition. Competition breeds excellence, it’s all
about competition. And it brings more customers. It brings more customers, everybody works
together, and the whole thing works. It’s become about the food, you know. Not only about the food, but it’s very much
factored into decisions to travel, you know. Sure. People just say, hey, well, you know, that’s
a great spot but there’s no restaurants. So if they look and they go hey that’s a
good spot, and you know, you can really, eat well there, that starts to make a whole difference. It can be the deciding point. It can be the decider, can’t it, you know. And you get the fish from the docks? Yeah, we get fish straight off the boats. Straight up the boats, straight, beautiful
fresh fish. Meat from the Kerry hills, and we grow all
our own vegetables, organically. Oh you do? So this is from our garden. We have the organic garden back in Bantry. Uh-huh. So now we have the freshness of the vegetables
that are coming in at the moment. Carrots purée and red cabbage some bac choy
and baby fennel, spinach an asparagus and white turnips. Um-hhm. Good and healthy, wholesome, and organic. That’s a black sole, also known as Dover
sole in certain areas. In England it’s called a Dover sole. It’s a beautiful fish, only best served
on the bone. Hake, and that’s a risotto, locally-made
chorizo on top. Here we have some ray wing, ray wing, also
known as skate, or a ray wing. It’s really quite different, juicy, juicy
taste. It’s organic wild boar from Ballinwillin
farm, a pancetta made from the wild boar, and a polenta cake, this polenta cake from
a purée. (kitchen noise) And the salad, yes. They are open for dinner every day except
Tuesday from 5:30 PM. It's easy to walk here. From the waterfront, for example, it is just
500 meters away. Dingle is rather compact. And our hotel is practically across the street. The Benners, a great place to rest up, and
get up in the morning and have a delicious Irish breakfast. Getting ready for another big day, we’re
leaving town and heading south. Be sure to look at our Ireland series for
the complete picture that opens the door to this magical country



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We’ve been exploring the West Coast of Ireland and now we’re heading for Dingle which some people would say is the finest destination in the country. Dingle is a lush green peninsula extending out into the Atlantic Ocean.
Entering the Dingle Peninsula and passing through villages of Blennerville, Camp and Annascaul.
We stop by the roadside for a lovely view looking down towards the coast and across the green fields.
Next stop, Dingle, our home base for the next couple days. The town is one of Ireland’s best with excellent hotels, of course many pubs, and in recent years, Dingle has become one of the gourmet capitals of the country with many fine restaurants. We will be taking you inside a couple of them. The drive in gave us a nice overview and will be taking you on several walks through town.
Most visitors find the real attraction is the surrounding areas with the beautiful countryside and the historic sites. With a few minute’s drive, you are at the edge of town and beyond that, you’re in the countryside almost immediately.
So we hop in our van and do a tour of the peninsula. It’s not unusual to run into some rain when you’re out here in the far tip of Europe, in the Atlantic Ocean. And we had some rain this morning, but it cleared up a little bit during the day.
Dingle is a peninsula sticking into the sea at the western edge of Europe, set amid wild green scenery surrounded by the ocean.
One of the main historic sites you’ll see is Dunbeg Fort. It’s quite typical of the Celtic fortresses of the Iron Age in Ireland. It’s built right up against the edge of a cliff, so it’s easy to defend itself with the big walls on one side and the sea cliff on the other.
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